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ADHD and cleaning house is a pain point for many of us. Of all the ADHD symptoms that annoy us, house cleaning is one that drives people with ADHD nuts. Many of us have a relationship with messiness that stretches back into childhood.

Some of my earliest memories of messiness began in elementary school. We all had assigned desks and my desk was a war zone. It was constantly crammed with papers, books, and missing school supplies. It distressed my teachers, annoyed my mother, and made my life a living hell.

When I got to high school, my desk mess was replaced with a locker mess. Ever seen an avalanche?
That’s what it looked like every time I opened my locker. Gym clothes, books, missing homework, cosmetics, all of it would cascade out every time I opened my locker. I went through college with the same problems.

By the time I got to adulthood, I understood well the effects of living with messiness. It wasn’t until I had an ADHD test and started going through ADHD treatment that I discovered the reason why I had so much trouble with messiness. Here’s the reason why

ADHD Symptoms that affect our ability to complete tasks

– inattention
-impulsivity
– forgetfulness
– inability to sustain focus

ADHD symptoms that affect our ability to organize

– restlessness
– multitasking ( doing too many things at once makes it difficult to focus)
– low frustration tolerance
– distractibility

The best thing for ADHD and cleaning

You don’t need a whole ADHD overview. You live with the disorder every day. There are some things that ADHD specialists just can’t teach you, and this is one of them. For the sake of our health and sanity, kids and adults with ADHD need a home that is (mostly) free of clutter, sanitary, and organized enough that we can find our most important things. House cleaning tests ADHD brains.I’m just going to put it out there: I’m not the best housekeeper. I do my best but let’s face it: it takes organization. We all know by now ADHD makes it really, really hard to stay organized. So I do the best I can. Even though I’ll never be Martha Stewart, I’ve found 5 ways to keep it just a little tidier. Here are the methods I’ve found that work with my ADHD brain.

1. Keep the common areas clean

Do you have company coming? Chances are they won’t wind up in your bedroom. Pay extra attention to your living room, kitchen, and bathroom. If you’re blessed with a dining room too, don’t let everyone stack their junk on that table ( a constant battle in my house). We ADHDers love two things: piles and procrastination. Piles complicate the process of ADHD house cleaning. Sorry, you can’t have both if you want to conquer this clutter. Give yourself some grace: it is difficult to reign our messiness in. Put your piles in the office and shut the door. If you have a clean living room, bathroom, and kitchen, you don’t have to stress the rest. Nobody’s perfect.

2. Put things away near where you use them

If you watch DVDs in your living room, store your DVDs in the living room. If you paint your nails in the kitchen, find a drawer to keep the polish in. In other words, make it foolproof for when the brain-fog days come. Housecleaning can be really personal, there are people who make it into a moral issue. Many feel like there is a very stringent view of what right and wrong is when it comes to putting something somewhere.

Here’s what I want you to do with that: let it go. If you need to keep your medication in the place where people normally keep their spices, do it. If you have to keep your toothbrush in your shower, who cares? None of these things matter as much as you keeping your home in the order that works for you. We have ADHD, they think we are weird anyway. What’s one more reason to be called weird?

3. Stash cleaner and wipes/dust cloths or paper towels in every room

This has revolutionized my cleaning habits. See, if I wander into another room, something might catch my eye in there, then the dusting will never get done. Therefore if all I have to do is reach for my spray and paper towels, I’ve got a way better chance of getting the TV/coffee table/mirror/whatever random thing wiped up and looking pretty. Keep a trash can in the rooms as well, you don’t want paper towels and wipes scattered all over your house.

This is a method that will allow you to clean when you see the mess versus keeping a regular cleaning schedule. Some of us work better with a regular schedule where we clean once per week. I am not that person. I clean a little bit here and there, and I have a standard for what the rooms of my home are supposed to look like. This has taken quite a while to establish. It is really important for you to remember that cleaning your home is very personal. It is about what works best for you.

4. Don’t wait for the huge mess before you attack

This is one I still struggle with. I like to do things once, do them right and move on. That’s great when you are on a regular schedule, but sometimes you just can’t be on one. I spent all summer on tour with Crazy Like a Fox, and during those times that I was home from touring, I would either clean for my life, or dump it all into a pile and move on. Cleaning like crazy works for a while, but it isn’t sustainable. Leaving everything in a pile is just as stressful as cleaning daily.

Where’s the balance? It is different for everyone, but I like to take my tasks in chunks. For instance, the huge pile of clean laundry on my bed? I’m going to sit tonight and listen to podcasts while I sort that out. When the messes get huge, we get overwhelmed. When you overwhelm the ADHD brain, it begins to shut us down. Being stuck in overwhelm means procrastination sets in. That’s how we wind up with messes that last for months or years. Head those messes off at the pass by dealing with them before they begin ( or as close to the beginning as possible).

5. Sometimes good enough has to be good enough.

People with ADHD, especially us girls, spend a lot of time thinking about how “normal” people do things. Oh, how we torture ourselves, believing that they have perfectly clean houses with no dust bunnies and everything stays fresh and tidy around the clock. By contrast, we see our clutter and piles and defeat ourselves before we even start. If you don’t have time to put everything away, put it in a basket and come back to it. The most important thing for you to understand about ADHD and house cleaning is to let go of the expectation of perfection. If you can’t vacuum the whole house, vacuum the living room and call it a day. Don’t waste your life making yourself miserable over a mess that isn’t going anywhere anyway. Choose your battles.

I know these tips for ADHD and cleaning house seem really simple, and they are. There is no magic secret to cleaning, the only thing we can do is make it more palatable. I listen to podcasts to keep my boredom level to a minimum. What’s your favorite cleaning tip? Leave it in the comments!

Until next time,

René

 

Keeping a house clean on top of managing ADHD can drive you crazy. Here's some easy steps to keep up without breaking down.Keeping a house clean on top of managing ADHD can drive you crazy. Here's some easy steps to keep up without breaking down.Keeping a house clean on top of managing ADHD can drive you crazy. Here's some easy steps to keep up without breaking down.Keeping a house clean on top of managing ADHD can drive you crazy. Here's some easy steps to keep up without breaking down.

4 thoughts on “ADHD and Cleaning House Is a Perpetual Challenge

  1. Probably the best thing I’ve ever heard, and the one I (try to) use as my mantra is “you can’t organize clutter.” Basically ABP – Always Be Purgin’. I’m constantly thinning out and throwing away. I keep a box in the living room for donations and every time it’s full it goes to the car. Even gifts I don’t like, want, can’t use, whatever. It’s the thought that counts but it’s getting donated. Like you said, it’s much easier when you only have yourself to deal with, and with kids and their stuff it’s even harder. But getting the useless stuff out in the first place gives you less to have to clean up in the long run.

  2. My challenge is anything that is out of sight is out of mind. That’s the “explanation “ I give myself for keeping the piles. Problem is, whatever isn’t lying on the top of that pile gets forgotten about because I can’t see it. Just like anything perishable that finds itself behind my jug of almond milk. See ya never til I smell ya. I am new to treatment. It’s a work in progress.

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